Bring on the birds

The action is hot around Cape May right now. Yellow-headed Blackbird, another (or a reappearance of the) Black-throated Gray Warbler, multiple Lark Sparrows, etc… not to mention the constant flow of migrants dominated by Caribbean wintering species (N. Parula, Cape May, etc.). Last night the low pressure system was positioned at just the right place to pump some new birds in to SE New Jersey so I expect more good things to come this morning. Here’s the radar from sunset last night through 5:00am today.

Frames are every 1/2 hour. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.

Base Reflectivity image from Fort Dix Base Velocity image from Fort Dix Base Reflectivity image from Dover AFB Base Velocity image from Dover AFB Base Reflectivity image from Upton NY Base Velocity image from Upton NY Composite Base Reflectivity image from the Northeastern USA

Again the low pressure systems that just won’t leave continue to spin over the mid-Atlantic and New England. These are both diverting migrants around us to our west, and depositing them on top of us, depending on their ever-changing position. Last night was a little of both with all of the western NY-based migrants diverting to PA before heading south, while those leaving Long Island were following a more typical route over Sandy Hook. The density of birds leaving eastern NY, though, was considerably less than points further west. Looking at the Fort Dix and Dover, DE radars it was clear that migration over NJ was pretty heavy and most of it was headed in a NW->SE direction. This, of course, favors Cape May and should result in some high densities on the island this morning (not to mention a good morning flight- which is where I’m headed now!).

Good Birding

David

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One Response to Bring on the birds

  1. Sandra Keller says:

    East Point in Cumberland County was a bit slow! Well, you said the birds were heading NW to SE! Diversity was a bit low also. Here are some migrant numbers:
    Many FLICKERS and BLUE JAYS
    18 EASTERN PHOEBES
    1 HOUSE WREN
    2 RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS
    CATBIRDS – actually quite numerous.
    1 PARULA – Heislerville area
    40 or so YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS
    9 PALM WARBLERS
    15 or so COMMON YELLOWTHROATS
    3 INDIGO BUNTINGS
    3 SONG SPARROWS
    4 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS