And the floodgates remain open

Here’s the radar from sunset last night through 5:00am this morning.

Frames are every 1/2 hour. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.

Base Reflectivity image from Fort Dix Base Velocity image from Fort Dix Base Reflectivity image from Dover AFB Base Velocity image from Dover AFB Base Reflectivity image from Upton NY Base Velocity image from Upton NY Composite Base Reflectivity image from the Northeastern USA

Light northerlies last night triggered another migration event across the entire eastern flyway. This time, though, densities were lower up north, suggesting a diminishing pool of migration-ready birds. Densities down south were considerably higher also demonstrating that the mass of long-distance migrants is making its way into warmer climes. As winds turned light and NE this morning the general trajectory of migration could also be seen mimicking the shift, with many birds heading SSW across NJ. Expect inland migrant traps to be best today, especially up north where winds have already turned NE. Down south winds are still out of the WNW which will benefit Cape May, delivering a fair amount of both songbirds and raptors throughout the day. If you’re lucky you might just re-find the American White Pelican seen late yesterday evening from the Hawkwatch!

Good Birding

David

This entry was posted in Birds, Fall Migration 2011, Forecast, Migration, Migration Radar, NEXRAD Migration Study. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to And the floodgates remain open

  1. Sandra Keller says:

    I just wanted that Gray Kingbird….. Anyway, super up here at Riverwinds in Gloucester County, NJ. I did exactly what I did yesterday to see the changes. Some big changes. And some the same! I am assuming lots of new birds in, some stayed from Wed. and Thursday. And some left! Migrant numbers:
    8 FLICKERS
    BLUE JAYS
    6 EASTERN PHOEBES
    1 BROWN CREEPER
    3 GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS
    6 RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS
    ROBIN numbers were high. CATBIRD numbers seemed low.
    BROWN THRASHER – 3
    1 BLUE-HEADED VIREO
    2 TENNESSEE WARBLERS
    2 NASHVILLE WARBLERS
    2 PARULAS
    4 MAGNOLIA WARBLERS
    2 BLACK-THROATED BLUES – both males.
    50 or so YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS
    3 BLACK-THROATED GREENS
    6 PALMS – 2 western, 4 eastern
    11 COMMON YELLOWTHROATS
    1 WILSON’S WARBLER – a female/young bird.
    2 SCARLET TANAGERS
    CHIPPING SPARROWS – I didn’t relocate the Clay-colored today. Moved
    on I presume.
    1 VESPER – still there.
    SONG SPARROWS
    3 LINCOLN’S SPARROWS
    7 SWAMP SWAMP SPARROWS
    20 or so WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS
    2 WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS
    10 or so JUNCOS
    1 PURPLE FINCH
    no Goldfinches!