New arrivals overnight

Although northerly winds clearly dominated at higher altitudes, light southerly winds at the surface allowed for moderate to heavy migration over the region last night. Here’s the radar from sunset last night through 5:30am this morning.

Frames are every 1/2 hour for reflectivity and velocity, and every hour for the regional composite. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.

Base Reflectivity image from Fort Dix Base Velocity image from Fort Dix Base Reflectivity image from Dover AFB Base Velocity image from Dover AFB Composite Base Reflectivity image from the Northeastern USA

As you can see from the composite image, migration was heaviest around the northeastern US and down around the Great Lakes, where southerly winds were strongest along the edge of the approaching cold front. Still, with clear skies and light winds over our area, Zugunruhe got the better of many birds that may have otherwise waited out better conditions just a weeks ago. Such are the patters of spring!

With no weather in the forecast to concentrate birds, but with light west winds over the state, I think the best bets for today will be inland migrant traps (Garret Mountain being my favorite) and coastal locations such as Sandy Hook. Of course, the best opportunity for diversity will be in south Jersey, and with the influx of birds apparent on the radar, we should see some new arrivals there this morning.

Be sure to come on back and let us know how it goes!

Good Birding

David

P.S. Come check out my migration forecast for the Mid-Atlantic on Birdcapemay.org

Please don’t forget to become a member of the Woodcreeper/Badbirdz flock today. Membership has its privileges, so read the Become a Member post to find out more.

November Migration

It’s a tough call, whether to continue the radar migration posts through November. It can be a great month for large movements of the common winter species, or as Sam Galick pointed out yesterday on Jerseybirds, it represents the best month for rarities in Cape May. Either way, I’ve just gotten my Mac up and running and can finally post the radar again, so I figured I’d give it a whirl and see how it compares to my old PC. So far I’m pleasantly surprised.

Here’s the radar from sunset last night through sunrise this morning:

Frames are every 1/2 hour for reflectivity and velocity, and every hour for the regional composite. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.
Base Reflectivity image from Fort DixBase Velocity image from Fort DixBase Reflectivity image from Dover AFBBase Velocity image from Dover AFBComposite Base Reflectivity image from the Northeastern USA

With the remnants of Noel spinning off the northeast, winds turned northwest over the region and set off some moderate to heavy migration. Movement was generally NNW–>SSE. The big question will be “what were those birds!?” 1000000’s of American Robins? White-throated Sparrows? Pine Siskins? Northern Saw-whet Owls? You’ll have to go find out and report back!

Good Birding

David

P.S. Come check out my migration forecast for the Mid-Atlantic on Birdcapemay.org

Please don’t forget to become a member of the Woodcreeper/Badbirdz flock today. Membership has its privileges, so read the Become a Member post to find out more.

Migration (website) season winding down

Well, my computer finally did bite the dust this morning, but I have to say I was lucky since it lasted through my presentation at the Florida Ornithological Society meeting on Saturday. I’ve now got a Mac, and I’m trying to get all the programs up and running so I can post the radar again soon…but not too soon, since the season is winding down anyway. Birds will continue to move through; but the vast diversity, that characterizes the peak of fall migration, has passed. As soon as I get my computer up and running I’ll continue to post whenever there’s a big flight. Early November is still good for major fallouts even if diversity is low. I will also put together a summary of this fall’s migration patterns, and let you know how the upgrades to the site are going as we move toward the spring. Thanks so much to all of you who have participated, commented, read, and joined the Woodcreeper/Badbirdz Flock. Your support is greatly appreciated, and will be instrumental in carrying the site through the coming year.
Enjoy the wonderful weather while it lasts, but don’t wish for too much warmth, as the Evening Grosbeaks are just over that hill!

Good Birding

David

Big migration over Jersey

Here’s the radar…my plane is boarding, gotta run!

Frames are every 1/2 hour for reflectivity and velocity, and every hour for the regional composite. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.
Base Reflectivity image from Fort DixBase Velocity image from Fort DixBase Reflectivity image from Dover AFBBase Velocity image from Dover AFBComposite Base Reflectivity image from the Northeastern USA

Good Birding

David

P.S. Come check out my migration forecast for the Mid-Atlantic on Birdcapemay.org

Please don’t forget to become a member of the Woodcreeper/Badbirdz flock today. Membership has its privileges, so read the Become a Member post to find out more.