Birds over Jerze

Variable winds, a big moon, and clear skies made for some decent migration conditions (so say birds across the entire eastern US). here’s the radar from sunset last night through 5:30am this morning.

Frames are every 1/2 hour for reflectivity and velocity, and every hour for the regional composite. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.

Base Reflectivity image from Fort Dix Base Velocity image from Fort Dix Base Reflectivity image from Dover AFB Base Velocity image from Dover AFB Composite Base Reflectivity image from the Northeastern USA

While the Central and Mississippi flyways were both showing very high levels of migration, the Eastern flyway still got in on the action with moderate to high levels throughout the night. The composite image really gives some perspective on the magnitude of migration across the region, and the individual radar loops indicate that New Jersey experienced a significant influx of birds into the entire state. The general trajectory was from the SSW–>NNE, owing to the southwesterly flow overnight.

With no weather present to concentrate birds, tried and true spring migrant traps will be the best bet this morning. With the southwest component to the wind, Garret Mtn., Sandy Hook and Cape May should all be good today.

Good Birding

David

P.S. Come check out my migration forecast for the Mid-Atlantic on Birdcapemay.org

Please don’t forget to become a member of the Woodcreeper/Badbirdz flock today. Membership has its privileges, so read the Become a Member post to find out more.

This entry was posted in Birds, Migration, Migration Radar, NEXRAD Migration Study, Spring Migration 2008. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Birds over Jerze

  1. Derek L. says:

    The floodgates have finally opened up here in Maine:

    http://outdoors.mainetoday.com/naturewatching/fieldnotes/025680.html

    Although, I do still have plenty of snow in the backyard!

    -D-Lo

  2. Susan Treesh says:

    I birded Assunpink today, but couldn’t find much of an influx. There was a moderate push of yellow rumps, and some of the breeding birds were abundant and vocal (towhees and – unfortunately – cowbirds), but other breeders, such as catbirds and thrashers, seemed to be present only in very small numbers.

  3. Beth Graham says:

    Last night, I saw one Black-crowned Night-Heron in this little creek on Featherbed Lane in Pilesgrove, NJ.

  4. Norma Holmes says:

    On Saturday, April 19th, four of us spent a little over an hour at Garret, at the South end of Barbour’s Pond from approx. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. There were many, many, palm warblers and ruby-crowned kinglets, great displays of ruby-red crests from time to time, some very brightly colored male yellow-rumps in breeding plumage, a creeper. a winter wren – all seen along the stream behind the restrooms. A black and white warbler and bg gnatcatcher was reported as being seen an hour before we arrived by a reputable birder. I had a good view of a solitary sandpiper in flight across the South end of the Pond – wings in a stiff sort of flutter beneath the horozontal and another view of it flying toward the North end of the Pond. The new locals- phoebes, red-wings, cowbirds were around. Will send a check for membership. I can’t get the paypal to work.