Heavy migration on northwest winds and clear skies

Now that’s migration! Here’s the radar from 7:00pm last night through 5:00am this morning. Due to technical difficulties, the regional composite image did not download correctly, and therefore could not be posted.

Frames are every 1/2 hour. Click on the thumbnail to view the full-sized animation.

Base Reflectivity image from Fort Dix Base Velocity image from Fort Dix Base Reflectivity image from Dover AFB Base Velocity image from Dover AFB

Winds were northwesterly over the northeastern and mid-Atlantic US last night, especially at ~3000 feet, making for some exceptional migration conditions. Despite the heavy migration, the clear skies and lack of precipitation will mean birds are dispersed across the landscape this morning, making critical the decision of where to go birding. The westerly component to the wind will favor coastal locations across the region, and will likely result in a very good morning flight at Higbee’s Beach in Cape May, NJ.

Good Birding

David

P.S. Come check out my migration forecast for the Mid-Atlantic on Birdcapemay.org

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This entry was posted in Birds, Fall Migration 2008, Forecast, Migration, Migration Radar, NEXRAD Migration Study. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Heavy migration on northwest winds and clear skies

  1. Blake Mathys says:

    Some migration on Cook Campus, Rutgers, New Brunswick, between the Plant Physiology Building and IMCS. All I could pick out were redstarts, but there was a small flock moving through the oak trees.

  2. Brian Clough says:

    migration was light on Duke Farms. A small smattering of neotrops: 2 red eyed vireos; single black throated blue, black and white, yellowthroat, hermit thrush, rt hummingbird. A somewhat more substantial number of short distance migrants; thrasher, towhee, catbird

  3. Sharon Liebs says:

    Nice flight at Higbees with redstarts, vireos, yellow warblers, yellowthroats, black & whites, black throated green, too many to mention but there was also a Lawrences Warbler which was a great thrill for me! Good Birding…

  4. Thanks for all the ground-truthing!

    I just got a message from Sam Galick reporting the largest flight yet this season at Higbee’s: 4,055 birds in total!

    Cheers

    David

  5. Simon Lane says:

    Good numbers of birds at Liberty State Park this a.m. between 6.30 and 7.45. 13 sp. of warbler including a female Cape May. N.Parula the most common species of wood warber.

  6. Sandra Keller says:

    Gloucester County was excellent. Birds spread out as usual, but everywhere. Hard to say what was predominant as I don’t get a flight like at Higbee’s. I just search different areas and find the birds!
    1 YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER
    2 “Traill’s” – I am presuming ALDER at this late date.
    1 LEAST FLYCATCHER
    5 EASTERN KINGBIRDS
    0 Veery – surprising – because even if I don’t see one, they are fairly vocal and distinctive that way.
    1 BLUE-HEADED VIREO
    9 WARBLING VIREOS – some could be breeders.
    2 RED-EYED VIREOS – same.
    2 BLUE-WINGED WARBLERS
    3 NASHVILLES
    1 PARULA
    1 YELLOW
    2 CHESTNUT-SIDED
    2 MAGNOLIA
    1 CAPE MAY
    1 BLACK-THROATED BLUE
    1 BLACK-THROATED GREEN
    1 PALM
    1 BLACKPOLL
    8 REDSTARTS
    1 OVENBIRD
    15 or so COMMON YELLOWTHROATS – some are probably breeders.
    1 CANADA WARBLER
    1 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK
    4 BALTIMORE ORIOLES
    These were spread out over various spots.